Tag Archives: plus size

9 Tips For Shopping DD+ Bras & Repping Your Fuller Cup Pride In Comfort

If you have a large bust, then you know how challenging finding the perfect DD+ bras can be. From getting properly fitted to finding the right kind of support, DD+ bra shopping can pose a unique set of challenges, and it can be tempting at times to admit defeat and settle for a lifetime of ill-fitting, boring designs in basic shades.

For a long time, I viewed my substantial chest as a major inconvenience. I longed for a small cup size, self-supporting boobs, and wispy, insubstantial bralettes. I hated how matronly I felt in the designs that were available to me, as well as the fact that it was almost impossible to find an H cup in most standard lingerie boutiques.

Over time, however, I learned the art of shopping for large breasts, and found ways to appreciate and celebrate my unique body just the way it was. I discovered amazing lingerie companies that actually make fun DD+ designs, and developed an understanding of specific styles and designers that work well for me. If you’re frustrated with the difficulties and complexities of navigating lingerie for the majorly busty, check out the tips I’ve acquired that can make living the DD+ life a little bit easier.

1. Get Professionally Fitted

Glamorize Elegance Front-Close Bra, Sizes 34D – 48G

It’s time to get yourself to a serious lingerie boutique. I’ve had very good experiences with Nordstrom, but any specialized shop with a wide selection of sizes and knowledgeable staff is a good bet. Knowing your correct size should make all the difference between a disappointing shopping experience and a great one.

Bra sizing is more than a question of appearance; wearing the wrong size bra can contribute to back, neck, and shoulder pain, especially for larger sizes. The vast majority of the support in a bra should come from the band, allowing your entire abdomen to support the weight of your chest, instead of relying on straps that pull and tug on weaker shoulder muscles.

2. Know What You Want Before You Shop

Freya Deco Delight Molded Plunge Bra, Sizes 28DD – 38G, ₦12,630.00, Whispers nigeria

It’s easy to walk into a store with a vague idea of what you might be looking for, only to become overwhelmed by the sheer variety of styles, colors, and sizes that are immediately thrust upon you. Shopping for DD+ bras is a serious undertaking. Before I start, I like to know not only my current size and the style of bra I’m looking for, but also the outfit(s) that I intend to wear this piece with, and the max budget I have to spend (good bras can get pricey).

Walking into a lingerie boutique armed with all this information keeps me from becoming distracted or unexpectedly splurging; it also limits the number of designs I have to try on, because getting in and out of structured undergarments can be exhausting. For example, if I know I’m looking for a multi-way or strapless for a formal event, there’s really no point in bothering with full coverage or sporty styles. Setting clear expectations for a shopping session can help minimize frustration and confusion later on, giving you a better overall experience.

3. Get To Know Different Styles

Seduction Lace Demi, Sizes 36C – 44H,

The language of lingerie can sometimes be more confusing than helpful. Balconette, plunge, multi-way, demi-cup, T-shirt bra: What do all these terms even mean? And more importantly, how will these styles make you look and feel? Although at first this language can seem arbitrary and jumbled, these different bra styles are made to offer you unique benefits depending on what look you’re hoping to achieve.

T-shirt bras are a great option for everyday support and comfort. These are usually designed to disappear under casual clothing, and are generally pretty simple in construction. Full coverage bras are great options if you like a lot of support and zero spillage. Balconette and demi-cup styles tend to do the opposite; they offer less coverage and push boobs up for maximum cleavage and sexy goodness; great for parties and your fave LBD, not as helpful for low-key or office environments. Finally, multi-way refers to a bra’s straps, not the cups. These bras should allow you to rearrange your straps in a number of ways (i.e. crossed in the back, T-backed, strapless, etc.) so that you can get maximum outfit potential from a single item.

4. Try On New Bras Under Clothes

Shadow Stripes Contour Flirt Bra, Sizes 38G – 42H

When you’re trying on bras, don’t forget to check out how different styles look under clothing. A bra that looks hella sexy on its own might create odd lines under the blouse you had planned on wearing it with, and there’s nothing more frustrating than getting home with some new lingerie only to find out it’s a no-go the next day when you’re getting dressed for work.

For more body positivity, check out the podcast below, and be sure to subscribe to The Bodcast for more inclusive inspiration.

Plus-size world’s golden girl Ashley Graham looks incredible as she strips off to display her curves for lingerie shoot on a private jet

  • The 28-year-old Navabi cover girl and supermodel unveils new range
  • Motto is ‘sexy is a state of mind’ and hopes range puts women in the mood
  • Has been an extremely successful 12 months for the star  

After breaking down barriers by appearing on the pages of Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit Edition, size 14 model Ashley Graham forged a career for herself as a body-positivity advocate and designer for girls of all sizes.

Clearly keen to make 2016 as successful as last year, Ashley is kicking off the year by unveiling her latest lingerie designs for women with curves – and models them all herself, of course.

The 28-year-old Navabi cover girl and supermodel says she has created lingerie that’s made to be seen and poses with two dapper men on a private plane to promote her latest designs.

Size 14 model Ashley Graham looks incredible as she strips off to display her curves and tanned body to promote her new lingerie range 

Size 14 model Ashley Graham looks incredible as she strips off to display her curves and tanned body to promote her new lingerie range

Her motto is ‘sexy is a state of mind’ and she hopes her new range of lacy garments will put women in the mood.

Ashley’s new shoot comes just weeks after she was hailed among the likes of Caitlyn Jenner and Amy Schumer as a 2015 breakout star on ABC 20/20’s The Year.

On the special, which aired last December, the 28-year-old plus-size model discussed her groundbreaking Sports Illustrated appearance. 

‘To me, it made a huge impact because you can see my full body,’ Ashley said. ‘I think the beauty in that I’m just such a full-figured woman, people were just like, ‘hubba hubba.”

On her own meteoric rise to fame, Ashley mused that her popularity is down to her frankness when it comes to discussing her weight.

‘I’m not afraid to talk about it,’ she added. ‘Love it or get over it.’ 

The plus-size world's golden girl's motto is 'sexy is a state of mind' and she hopes her new range of lacy garments will put women in the mood.

The plus-size world’s golden girl’s motto is ‘sexy is a state of mind’ and she hopes her new range of lacy garments will put women in the mood.

She’s flying the flag for curvy women everywhere and Ashley Graham has now launched another collection in her range of lingerie.

Not only is she known for her underwear range she inspires women everywhere and is a model too, not to mention her website full of fashion tips – she is one busy woman!

But it’s the stunning lingerie designs we particularly love that kept women’s varying figures in mind when produced. The pieces are practical and pretty and we love Ashley’s motto: ‘sexy is a state of mind’. This new range features this stunning red lacy number with contrasting black piping and you can pick one up (right) at Navabi plus the matching pants below.

Ashley believes that her popularity is down to her frankness when it comes to discussing her weight

Ashley believes that her popularity is down to her frankness when it comes to discussing her weight, Ashley Graham stars in racy promo for Addition Elle lingerie

Ashley Graham wows New York Fashion Week with lingerie line

Plus-size model Ashley Graham has made her New York Fashion Week debut, taking to the catwalk in her own lingerie line.

The 27-year-old wowed the crowed in black undergarments and a lace kimono.

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Ashley Graham hits the catwalk at New York Fashion Week. (Getty)

Graham told US Today the experience gave her chills.

“It was absolutely amazing,” she said.

“For the longest time I could find supportive bras and I could find sexy bras, but never both,” she said.

“I wanted to create a line that did both and made [women] feel beautiful.”

The size 16 model has become an advocate for women of all ages struggling with body issues after becoming the first plus-size model to appear in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition.

She said she wanted the line to be both supportive and sexy. (Getty)ca

She said she wanted the line to be both supportive and sexy. (Getty)

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Graham is wearing her own lingerie line. (Getty)

Lingerie is not porn.

 

pink bra knickers

“I love this post as soon as I read it but I didn’t really think I had to repost it until I was told by my bank that they were reluctant to work with The Lingerie Company because we sell Underwears. As women, living outside the west especially, we have been lectured by mothers, fathers, aunties and sisters that the feminine things are unsightly and unbecoming of women to show off. These are all lies. Be proud to a women, feel gorgeous in your beautiful lingerie. We hope you enjoy this post as much as we did” Love, Whispers nigeria x

About a year ago, while trying to get some work done on the train from Seattle to Portland, I was startled to discover that a couple of my favorite shopping websites, namely Bare Necessities and HerRoom, were blocked for being “pornographic.” Now just to be clear, I both understand and am completely on board with restricting access to sexually explicit material in public spaces. There are no private seats on the train to Portland, and no one should be exposed to pornography without their consent (least of all children). But I don’t think it really hit me until that moment that many people view lingerie as something akin to porn, and that specifically, sites like Bare Necessities and HerRoom (which, let’s face it, are pretty boring as lingerie websites go) are equivalent with porn.“How absurd is it,” I thought, “that, for women, buying underwear is an ‘adult activity?’”

In the 12 months since, I’ve thought a lot about how lingerie is minmized in the fashion world. Yes you have your Victoria’s Secret and your Agent Provocateur, but generally speaking, the lingerie dialogue is limited to just 3 main topics: bra fit, shapewear, and how lingerie is ruining the lives of girls and making it impossible for them to become doctors. The rich, complex world of intimate apparel – the fashion of it, the history of it, the economics of it – is narrowed to less than a handful of “acceptable” topics, with everything else deemed “too sexual.” And I believe that stance has a profound effect on how women, both younger women and older women, see and relate to their bodies.

First of all though, let me just say that this article has nothing to do with being anti-porn or anti-sex. As a matter of fact, I don’t think the ethics of porn has anything to do with this particular discussion. And, of course, I have zero interest in vilifying sex; if lingerie makes your bedroom life better, more power to you. Rather, I want to talk about why lingerie is always assumed to be sexual, and what that means for women’s bodies. And yes, I’m aware that women are not the only consumers of lingerie, but I believe the specific kind of sexualization I’m talking about here happens almost exclusively to women.

As a lingerie blogger and, more importantly, as a consumer of lingerie, I firmly believe that intimate apparel, as the name implies, is a deeply personal form of attire.  It can be an entirely valid means to self-discovery and self-expression, and for some people, their underwear is the only place they get to truly be who they are and wear what they want. That is a powerful thing, and it makes me sad that the topic is almost always suppressed in favor of easier, more “socially appropriate” ways of discussing lingerie.

Of course, chances are that if you’re a regular Lingerie Addict reader, I’m preaching to the choir. TLA is a place to talk about the fashion of intimate apparel with a smattering of social commentary, but we’re constantly bumping up against the walls of censure and censorship. From the little things, like emails from readers who wonder what my family think of my “lifestyle,” to larger things, like being disinvited from programs or opportunities because the content of my blog is “offensive,” I am constantly reminded that lingerie is a special case. There’s room to talk about it terms of pure practicality (bras and Spanx) or pure sexuality (either as a bedroom aid or an assault upon our youth), but not much room for any nuance or subtlety between those positions. It’s as strange to me as if the conversation on shoes was limited to orthotic sandals and fetish heels. Obviously, there’s a lot more to choose from in the world of footwear than those two things!

Now I’m sure some will argue that lingerie is different because it’s worn directly on the body, right next to the skin. Specifically, it’s worn on a woman’s body, and even more specifically over areas like the breasts and genitals. And I can understand having a certain delicacy about private areas. But what I don’t understand is the titillation that’s automatically attached to women’s underwear in a way that’s not attached to men’s. Or rather, I should say I do understand it, but I don’t like it.

To assume that lingerie is always about sex ignores the role women have, the role womenshould have, in determining what their attire means to them. It reminds me of how, historically, “good” women had to avoid makeup, lest they be seen as “loose” women (a stigma I don’t believe has entirely gone away yet, though it is better) or how a woman in pants was seen as scandalous and shocking and “manlike.” It’s taken for granted now that cosmetics and trousers can have multiple meanings, but lingerie hasn’t achieved that status yet.

When intimate apparel is seen as something that exists primarily for sex, it becomes “vulgar,” and, by extension, the bodies wearing it become “vulgar” as well. All of a sudden, an exposed bra strap, a visible pantyline, or the slightest hint of a nipple becomes a disgrace. The body itself is stigmatized, and that stigma has huge consequences. I’ve had so many conversations with women who don’t even know the most basic things about their own breasts and genitals. And that kind of shameful ignorance results in damaging myths, from our idea of what a “normal” or “average” breast looks like to the myth that bras cause breast cancer. A climate where women’s bodies are seen as a problem is a climate that encourages women to be ignorant about their bodies.

Lingerie is not porn. Women should be able to talk about their bodies, to share photos of their bodies, to speak about their bodies, in editorial, artistic, or health-related contexts without being told that what they’re doing is equivalent to sex work. And again, there’s nothing wrong with sex or sex work, but self-determination matters. Women have the right to decide which communities they want to be a part of, and women should have the right to exert some say in how their bodies are perceived. We should feel comfortable talking about our bodies publicly without having to worry about being involuntarily turned into sex objects.

The solution here isn’t to resign ourselves to, “This is the way it’s always been and always going to be.” Rather it’s to discuss why. When someone says lingerie is “nasty,” what are they saying? When someone says I should be ashamed for running this site, what do they mean? When lingerie is seen as equivalent to porn and lingerie models to pornographic actresses, what’s the underlying context? Does lingerie always have to have erotic intent? Or is there the potential for something more? For a broader, deeper conversation? Let’s decouple the concept of “decency” from lingerie, and, in the process, let’s stop shaming the bodies of people who wear it.

What do you think about the lingerie is not porn question? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

Reposted from The Lingerie Addict